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Principles of the Teaching of Bahá'u'lláh,
Explained by 'Abdu'l-Bahá in Paris

Here are, very briefly explained, some of the principles of Bahá’u’lláh.

In short, it behoves us all to be lovers of truth. Let us seek her in every season and in every country, being careful never to attach ourselves to personalities. Let us see the light wherever it shines, and may we be enabled to recognize the light of truth no matter where it may arise. Let us inhale the perfume of the rose from the midst of thorns which surround it; let us drink the running water from every pure spring.

('Abdu'l-Bahá: Paris Talks, Pages: 133 - 134)

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Baha'is in the Albany, New York USA cluster celebrate Naw-Ruz, the beginning of the New Baha'i Year. (Photo by Paul Murray, BahaiPrinciples.org)
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View a larger picture. 2010-03-20 (157 Baha'i Era), ALBANY, NEW YORK, USA — Celebrations to mark the Baha'i New Year take different forms throughout the world but typically include programs of spiritual upliftment, music, dancing and feasting.

The Baha'i New Year festival known as Naw-Ruz (literally "New Day") is held on the spring equinox, March 21, but the celebrations began the evening before because the Baha'i day begins at sunset.

The event held in Albany was typical of the kind of multi-cultural celebration observed in many of the 120,000 localities where Baha'is -- who embrace human diversity -- reside around the world.

The festival comes at the end of a 19-day fast in which adult Baha'is abstain from food and drink between sunrise and sunset as a reminder of the need for individuals to be detached from their material desires.

Naw-Ruz is the first day of the first of 19 months in the Baha'i calendar, which was initiated by the Bab, the Forerunner of the Faith's Prophet-Founder, Baha'u'llah, who later confirmed it.